Tips and Hints that EVERYONE Should Know About After Effects.

Click the image to go to the tutorial

Hey Guys,

Here is a repost of Topher Welsh’s tutorial featured on aetuts+ about how to streamline your After Effects operations. If, like me you are wanting to get a job in design we must all acknowledge that a lot of projects will be tight to a dealine, this tutorial helps you shave of those valuable seconds; iterating all the keyboard shortcuts and other tips to help streamline you work process. As someone who has been using After Effects for about 8 months now, I still knew less than half of the tips in this tutorial and I’m sure it will benefit a great range of people that take the time to read it. You can view the tutorial by clicking the banner or clicking here.

Peace,

Matt  :)

 

 

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CGI VS Real Life

Go to AEtuts+.com

Hey Guys,

Here is a slightly old tutorial from AEtuts+ that shows you how to use expressions to control the movement of individual letters helping to create a realistic simulation of the word dangling from rope. Whilst the tutorial itself is very good it also leads me onto a point that I would urge you to listen to.

I have seen many, many videos on the internet during my internet browsing experiences, and though I would never claim to be a master or expert of motion design or film, I would say that the best video effects I have seen are the ones that are stripped back to their most raw elements. To clarify, if you learn the lessons of this tutorial you will no doubt benefit from the skills it demonstrates and I would still urge all readers of this article to learn those lessons-but also consider, how would the effect of the dropping letters be comprimised by just setting up the effect yourself and filming it?

As our species’ technological advancements race ever faster towards the future, look back at the most basic skills you may of learnt when you started filming or creating videos; is it fair to say that we are letting CGI (computer generated effects) overly dictate the way we insert challenging effects into our film, tv and advertising?

These thoughts came to my mind because I have seen this effect replicated in a similar way by an amatuer filmaker on his vimeo account (watch it here) and though his props are fairly cheap, I genuinley thinks it looks better the way he did it (please leave a comment letting me know what you think by the way!). A more commercial example of this is the blood effects in The Expendables; for anyone that hasn’t seen it, Stallone for some reason decides to replicate all blood splatters digitally. Sadly for Stallone the blood effects look very, very cheap-clearly identifiable as CGI even for audiences who aren’t familar with what to look for; this is only one example of many other injustices by film companies, substituting the real for the simulated.

So that’s me done; don’t get me wrong, I still have a huge interest in computer effects and would love to work in design in the future but is there a line which we, as designers must become aware of, so that we can stop ourselves from crossing it?

Please leave a comment below with your thoughts.

Peace,

Matt :)

Tutorials Seen in my Showreel.

“We Can’t help Everyone, but Everyone can Help Someone.”

– Ronald Reagan

Hey Guys,

As this site has just launched and chances are no one is even reading what I am writing I suppose this is kind of pointless, however I will continue anyway. Anyone that has used this site will hopefully of checked out my showreel and hopefully enjoyed it too. However I fully confess to be a complete amateur design artist and I cannot take full credit for all of the work presented. Whilst all content was generated by me, several clips were based very closley off of tutorials with only minor changes. I will credit all tutorials in this post and if anyone decides to follow them, leave a comment with a link to what you came out with.

The first clip in the showreel is a title I made for a montage trailer (Back when I was still editing gaming videos), the title looks sweet but it is more of less just a copy of the tutorial for realistic fog on aetuts.com. You can watch Sachin man Joshi’s amazing tutorial on realistic fog effects here.

The next tutorial I would like to credit is videocopilots ‘animating a still’ lesson; the effects they present in this video help bring life to any still image and whilst I didn’t use all the effects demonstrated it was massive influence on my ‘Pakistan is Drowning’ project (repeated several times int he showreel). You can watch Andrew Kramers amazing tutorial on animating a still here.

There is a shot towards the latter end of the video of a 3D audio spectrum evolving and changing changing colour, whilst I input the colour change to correspond with the pitch shift, the 3D spectrum itself was an incredibly technical peice of design work that took me many attempts to get functioning correctly. However as this tutorial is mainly based on expressions (a particular weakness of mine) I had to copy the expressions to the letter, the only creative input I had was the colour and camera work. You can watch Satya Mekas genius tutorial on 3D audio spectrums here.

Finally I would just like to acknowledge a more general tutorial; whilst colour grading is subjective the mood and feel of a particular shot/ photograph you still need to know which tools to use. I benifited greatly from watching a few colour grading tutorials and then experimenting but as an all round tool overview this tutorial will suit most needs. You can watch Hugo Tromps useful tutorial on colour grading here.
Please leave a comment linking to any tutorial based work you have made and let us know what you think of the tutorials listed above.

Peace,

Matt  :)